Tag Archives: empathy

Blow Out The Candles On Bullying & Cyberbullying For Good!

Hi Everyone!

During the month of November, Megan Taylor Meier would have been turning 23! That’s right 23 years old! Help us celebrate Megan’s birthday by giving your gift of $23 throughout November to help us achieve our goal of $23,000!

Why are we doing this?

Because over 160,000 students stay home everyday from school for the fear of being bullied. Because no one deserves to fall victim to bullies and live in constant fear that they will be tormented. Because no one deserves to feel worthless, left out, unimportant, and empty by the doing of an aggressor. The bullying and cyberbullying has gone on for too long and it’s time that we put an end to it for good!

Making your donation of $23 throughout the month of November will help the Megan Meier Foundation continue our mission to put and end to bullying and cyberbullying in our world, celebrate Megan’s 23rd birthday, and honor all lives lost to suicide.

 

Did you know that your donation of just $4.70 helps the Megan Meier Foundation impact ONE child who struggles with bullying and cyberbullying?

That means your donation of $23 will impact over FOUR children through the  Megan Meier Foundation! 

Head on over to meganmeierfoundation.org to make your donation of $23 or YOUR age in dollar amount and help us blow out the candles on bullying, cyberbullying, and suicide for good!

Thank you for your support!

XOXO

Megan Meier Foundation

Be Your Own Kind of Change

Be the Change pledge

When you hear the words “Be the change you wish to see in the world”, what is it that you see?

Do you see a world with no discrimination? With no broken homes? With equal opportunity?

Throughout the month, we have been partnering with Ledbetter and taking a step back to determine what it truly means to “Be the change”. Truth is, to everyone, that change means something different – we ALL want to see something different happening in the world that we live it.

So when you ask yourself, “what is my change?”, what comes to your mind?

They say a ship is safe in the harbor, but that’s not what ships are for.

As we wrap up the month of July we are challenging YOU to become the change. You are the difference maker. The world changer. The change that this world needs to see. We challenge you to live out that change and sign our pledge to live a life that changes ideas, voices, opinions – to be whatever that change is that you need to see!

Take the pledge and live for better tomorrows by downloading your own here, then take a photo and share with us all over social media with #LedbetterCampaign and #LTBTC

Where in the United States is Bullying Most Evident?

Written by Ryan Smith, Megan Meier Foundation Intern

blog 14 pic 1I came across a very interesting statistic while doing some research on bullying recently. The article, originally written in 2011 by author Michael Miller, informs us of the 5 states where bullying occurs the most often in the U.S.

For clarification purposes, we should first give a formal definition of the term “bullying.” Bullying is defined as the “physical, verbal, or psychological attacks or intimidation against a person who cannot properly defend himself or herself. It includes two key components: 1. Repeated harmful acts. 2. Imbalance of power.”

Before reading on and hearing what states the act of bullying occurs most often, I would challenge you to think on your own for a moment and consider your most educated guess. Do you think it is relative to the north or the south? The east or the west? Could it be your very own home state?

One thing that we are all sure of is that bullying occurs in every state in the U.S. With that said, here is the list of 5 most frequent in our country:

  1. California
  2. New York
  3. Illinois
  4. Pennsylvania
  5. Washington

It is important to point out that this data is recorded based on percentage of bullying incidents per state in relation to the total population, not necessarily the total number of examples overall (otherwise, states like Texas and Florida would crack the top 5).

You may asking yourself “does data that was collected in 2011 still apply today in 2015?” The image below is a much more up-to-date infographic which depicts, among other things, the worst states to live in for bullying K-12 in the U.S. (you’ll notice a consistent trend – look at the top right).

blog 14 pic 2

Raising awareness, while at the same time publicly expressing displeasure with the way particular state(s) are handling their bullying issues, is a great way to go about change. Nobody wants to say that they live in a state on the list of the top 5 worst of anything, so hopefully we can continue to make strides as a society as we head into the future.

http://www.cohoes.org/DASA/DASA.cfm


With your help, we can make a difference. Help end the fight against bullying. Join the conversation using the hashtag #StopBullying and #BeTheChange.

Bullying in School: Public Vs. Private

Written by Ryan Smith, Megan Meier Foundation Intern

blog 12 picture

For years now, we have known about the dangers of bullying for teenagers all around the world. Unfortunately, we have learned that bullying and cyberbullying are a part of the daily life for many students growing up in our school systems.

What we as a society tend to overlook is the bullying in public schools versus the bullying in private schools. For the most part, everything that we hear in the media (television, social media, etc.) is based on public school systems… but what about private schools?

To answer this question, a long five-year (2010-2014) survey was conducted. Roughly 185,000 students from both public and private schools participated in the study to help raise awareness on social trends. Here is what they found:

  • Anti-bullying policy was enforced more at private than public schools.

According to the survey results, bullying was taken a lot more seriously in private schools than public schools, with 45% of public school students reporting anti-bullying policies compared to 59% of private school students reporting the same. The most logical answer for this is typically private schools are smaller with more funding, whereas public schools are larger and have less freedom to implement new policies as they please. 

  • Private school students are more “accepting” of their peers than public school students.

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics,  “homosexual and bisexual teens are more likely to report bullying, along with students having disabilities.” 47% of private school and only 36% of public school students who are viewed as “different” report being accepted in their environment. It’s fair to say that demographics plays a role in these trends, as public school students are much more diverse (52% white, 24% Hispanic, 16% black, 8% other) than private school students (72% white, 10% Hispanic, 9% black, 9% other).

  • Peer pressure is the same, no matter where you go to school.

Surprisingly, 50% of students in both public and private schools claimed peer pressure was a problem in their environment. One observation that can be made based on these results is that peer pressure in public schools has more to do with making friends and “fitting in” while peer pressure in private schools has more to do with competitive academics.

  • Social scene trends are more apparent in public schools.

Public schools tend to be more cliquey (52% of students say) than private school students (only 38%).  This may be because private schools generally have smaller class sizes and fewer social groups compared to the larger class sizes and more social circles that fill a public school.

So what does this all mean?

The biggest takeaway you should have after reading this is that bullying is evident in every school, no matter public or private, although there are different factors to consider for each.


With your help, we can make a difference. Help end the fight against bullying. Join the conversation using the hashtag #StopBullying and #BeTheChange

“Dear Greenhille”

While exploring the internet lately, we couldn’t help to notice the powerful message the Greenhille High School students were delivering to their student body. As seniors, the class of 2015 was fed up with the way that their own peers were treating each other and decided to take a stand. In case you missed it….

See more images and read about their movement here.

To Feel or Not To Feel by Kaisee Perkins

We would like to acknowledge our friend Kaisee Perkins for this blog post “To Feel or Not To Feel”. Thank you for sharing with us Kaisee! 

To feel or not to feel?  That is the question.  A couple of words that I think people need to understand.  The first one being empathy, a word that is used to describe the ability to understand and to share feelings.  The second being sympathy, a word that is used to describe a feeling of pity and sorrow for someone’s misfortune.  For those that have been bullied, was there a time which you felt like you were in search of empathy? I know there was to me.

Bully, bullied, bullying, these are such strong words. But they get over-used way too much. A second grader sitting in class throws his hand up in the air, “Teacher! He won’t let me use his crayon, he’s bullying me!” The teacher gets up walks to the table and administers discipline to the child who wouldn’t give the other kid the crayon. The boy, hollering at the teacher, got his way. Was that boy, the one who didn’t give the other the crayon a bully? Once again, over used. These three words bring a problem to my eyes.

Walking through the halls of high school, a senior waits before the bell in a different classroom than the one she is supposed to be at. The bell rings, then rings again. She walks out of that class room, late to class, into the classroom she should be in.

(You are probably puzzled.)

This senior was told to not be in the hallways with a certain person. This SENIOR had to avoid even eye contact with a particular person. Why you may ask? Well, after this senior was accused of several different things, she was investigated. All investigations led to no findings. Nothing happened to the accuser except for the ongoing use of what I would consider power.

Not everyone understands those three words. It hurts.

People who have been in those situations where they were the victim, cry for help. They reach out for understanding too. They want to be heard! They go to speak and they are told they are crazy, to shut up, to just….drop it. They are crying for someone’s EMPATHY not someone’s sympathy.

We are told to get over it, its life, it happens to everyone. We are pushed and pushed to get over something that is so hard to overcome.  We need help. If we aren’t alone, then why is empathy so hard to come by? Empathy IS our help.

I close in saying, YOU are not alone in anyway. Whether it is YOUR FAITH, YOUR FAMILY, or even just EMPATHY (a cry for help), YOU are not alone. So, there’s just one thing I would like you to think about? Should we feel or Should we not feel?